Further observations on the Kindle


Here are some further observations on the Kindle:

  • Each version of the Kindle (tablet or app) returns a reader to the last page viewed in a title.
  • While the arrow buttons on the tablet make for easy page turning, it can be tedious to use them to turn back more than a few pages to return to a section; you can use the menu to “go to” a location number (numbers for various locations are shown at the bottom of every page). Or, you can sync to the furthest page read, but to do so, you must first have turned your annotations backup on, which can be found in the settings menu. The Kindle must have had Wi-Fi access enabled at the time you last had the book or article open to allow Amazon.com to store that data.
  • In the PC app, you can view the menu of available titles by most recent, title, author and length.
  • The tablet and PC app come with a dictionary, which can come in handy when reading old books with archaic words.
  • The popular highlights feature lets you see what other Kindle readers think are the most interesting passages in a book you have. Highlighted passages will be highlighted in your book.

 

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Observations on the Kindle


Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of blogs on the Kindle.

There are two versions of the current Kindle: the Wi-Fi model, for $139, and the 3G/Wi-Fi model, for $189.

While it would be nice to have the model with 3G wireless access, I opted for the cheaper one since I had placed it on my Christmas list. I have access to Wi-Fi at work, so it’s not an inconvenience.

The E Ink technology makes for an amazingly easy read even on what is only a 6-inch screen – much easier than my larger laptop screen with its backlit video screen. It’s much easier to read from the Kindle screen than from my tiny Blackberry screen.

The E Ink makes for a true book-like read which is easy on the eyes, and the size of the text at normal view is large enough for comfort – and it can be adjusted larger. Also, you can read it outside without glare.

 

Books and other orders are downloaded in less than a minute, an amazing feat considering the amount of time it can take to load a simple page on an Internet browser on your computer.

I quickly adapted to navigating through book pages and newspaper sections and stories.  Forward and backward arrow buttons are strategically placed on the left and right sides, making for convenient page turning.  There is a four-way arrow button placed around an Enter button that can be used to change stories in newspaper editions, etc. Other control features include a QWERTY keypad. The Home button takes you from a book to the menu of the media loaded onto your machine. The Menu button gives you such options as accessing the wireless connection, checking for new media orders and viewing notes (You have the ability to highlight and copy text to notes.).

The battery is rated to last up to a month, and after four days of using my Kindle, there’s no sign of the battery dying anytime soon, so I cannot yet rate this claim. The Kindle defaults to sleep mode after a few minutes of no use, showing a mix of screen savers that include portraits of famous authors and drawings from old books.

Cons: Although the Kindle has a built-in Web browser, I have only used it to connect to the Amazon.com Kindle site to set up my device and order some books. Web browsing is not Kindle’s forte, especially with the limited control panel. That’s the only con I have found so far.

Next blog: The Kindle on a budget

Kindling an interest among friends


I received an Amazon Kindle (the Wi-Fi graphite) for Christmas, and I intend to chronicle my experiences on it.

These postings will be rudimentary “of course” knowledge to those who have been fortunate enough to use a Kindle these last few years or those who otherwise have followed the Kindle’s history. But I have already run into a number of people – who of course know about the Kindle but have never laid eyes directly on a Kindle and who have shown a great interest in mine. I will refer them to this blog, and I hope I can provide some insights to a cyber audience seeking basic knowledge about the Kindle.

Here is a link to my model’s full description on Amazon.com.

Next blog entry: Basic observations on the Kindle

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