The Kindle on a budget


I was a holdout for several years on ebooks, including the much-touted Kindle. I’m a journalist and a bookworm, a lover of the printed word, and to me, nothing could compare to the allure of text on paper. Certainly computers and smart phones cannot compare to reading a newspaper or a (paper-print) novel. The price of ebook readers was another factor. But I could no longer ignore the changing nature of print media – even as I finished earning an MBA to stretch my workplace skills, I began forcing myself to upgrade my technical abilities – I bought a Blackberry, and I began blogging and using Twitter.

Cheapness is the feature that finally won me over to the Kindle (I have been called a cheapskate more than once). Amazon.com had dropped the entry-level price to $139. I began researching the Kindle and discovered rave reviews by users on its E Ink technology that allows words and pictures to appear just like ink on paper. (I learned the reviews were true once I started using my Kindle).

Even as Amazon.com was drawing flack for trying to force ebook prices up, I read that many classic books are available for free on the Kindle. And indeed they are. I have downloaded well more than two dozen free classics, ranging from “The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne to “The Invisible Man” by H.G. Wells. I just finished reading Jonathan Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels” and have started Jules Verne’s “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.” Some versions of these books are free, while other electronic versions cost a few dollars and are still a bargain.

I have also downloaded free games – Mine Sweeper and Blackjack.

A final appealing feature of the Kindle is the access to newspapers like the Wall Street Journal. I have subscribed to the WSJ for $14.99 per month, but am enjoying my first two weeks for free. Additional print media options for the Kindle include The New York Times, USA Today, regional papers like The Houston Chronicle, and magazines like Time. Since my Kindle was a Christmas gift, my only expenses associated with it have been a case and the WSJ subscription.

My next Kindle blog will look at how it and other ebook readers fit in with the future of newspapers.

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About Jason Reynolds
I'm a reporter, blogger, husband and aspiring author. When I'm not working, spending time with the family, or reading (which is quite a bit), I enjoy cooking, traveling, photography and wrangling my family's cats and chickens.

One Response to The Kindle on a budget

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention The Kindle on a budget « Jason's Marketing Primer Blog -- Topsy.com

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