Reality Check: THERE IS NO Moral Equivalency Between Israel and Hamas

pundit from another planet

For the New York Post,Charles Schumer writes: Amid the recent troubles between Israel and the Palestinians, many Americans and media commentators are drawing disturbing lines of parallelism between the two societies, asserting a false moral equivalency to the actions of each.

“How did Hamas and too many diverse parts of the mainstream Palestinian community respond to the kidnap and murder of three young Israelis? They cheered.”

In essence, the claim goes like this: “Both sides are fighting each other with similar degrees of violence; both treat each other equally badly; each side is equally to blame for the violence, and they just can’t come together.”

“And is it no wonder, given the vitriolic hatred of Israel that has been preached in textbooks and schools to two generations of Palestinian children.”

That notion that there is a moral equivalency between the defensive and targeted actions that the rule-of-law-based Israel…

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“Nothin’s Impossible For A Man If He Don’t Have To Do It Hisself” !!!!

Levi's Daily Thoughts


As a “cowpoke”, I cannot remember a time when I have not walked into certain businesses, particularly barbershops and banks in our area, and hanging on the wall was the Back Forty calendar. When I see one I always read the humorous one or two line caption that most of the time bring out real life truth in a “cowpoke” way. This particular one is not from the Back Forty calendar. Ace Reid has for many years written of “cowpokes” and this is one of his similar cartoons .

In life, it does ring true, that if you have enough resources you can have accomplished about anything this world has to offer. The “cowpoke” above is picking and shoveling and toiling, while the rancher is sitting and watching the task being done. The rancher is paying the “cowpoke” to do his work for him.

Spiritually speaking, “nothin’s impossible for a man if he don’t…

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Fund: Feds Lifting Statute of Limitations to Seize Tax Refunds for Parents Debt? Not Cool

Tennessee Parenting Plans Law

[ooyala code=”htb3V5ZzqPugxU9XWl6mvgdjjbqkxW1b” player_id=”ffbcf8e010eb4c238d3dda4eb935d806″]

The Tennessee Supreme Court has just made changes to the state’s parenting plans law.

It should make it easier for divorced parents to work out an arrangement with their children.


  • Kendra Armstrong Law
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Belgian Government to Push Ahead: Plan to Euthanise Children

Life means less and less in a Godless society.

How not to handle a heated Facebook discussion

A story about the firing of a TV meteorologist who defended herself against a racist, insensitive Facebook remark about her hair style left me shaking my head over the lack of thinking by her former employers.

A story by Lylah M. Alphonse on Yahoo! Shine reported on the firing of Rhonda A. Lee by KTBS in Shreveport, La. It seems Lee made the mistake of defending herself against an ignorant attack. Click here to read the story.

On Oct. 1, Alphonse says a viewer posted on the station’s Facebook page: “the black lady that does the news is a very nice lady. the onlt [sic] thing is she needs to wear a wig or grow some more hair . im not sure if she is a cancer patient. but still its not something myself that i think looks good on tv.”

The Facebook user who made the comments later apologized.

Alphonse’s story shows Lee’s measured response. It seems, however, her former employer thought she was violating their unwritten social media policy. That’s right, Lee was fired for multiple violations of an unwritten policy, Alphonse reports. (Lee had previously defended herself from another online attack). The only formalization of the social media policy is a mention in an email  memo sent to station employees, Alphonse reports; the policy reportedly was first introduced during a meeting that Lee did not attend, Alphonse reports.

An online petition has been started to help Lee regain her job.

A statement by the National Association of Black Journalists says, “We encourage media companies to protect employees on official social media platforms that are used to engage news consumers. We urge managers to be more sensitive to social media comments and attacks on their employees. Many companies employ social media editors or utilize electronic systems to quickly discard offensive comments, but not all organizations do.” You can read the statement here.

It’s extremely important for a company taking disciplinary action, especially termination, to have well-documented policies and procedures. The company not only clarify duties, responsibilities and rights for employees, but such documentation helps protect the company from potential litigation. I don’t believe an emailed memo is sufficient.

And let me state a personal opinion: a person has a right to defend herself, especially if the attack is malicious and personal.

And like so many employers, the managers at KTBS do not understand how to effectively employ social media. Social media is highly interactive, with dialogue flowing from both sides: users from around the world, and company management and personnel. Traditional media like TV stations and newspapers are one-sided exchanges: information flows from the media source to the user. Some media professionals have trouble adapting to the concept that social media involves ongoing dialogue between both sides; to them, social media is one more thing to check off the list of trying to reach out to people who may not consume your traditional product (newspaper edition or TV news broadcast).

Lee handled the attack against her in a professional way, and I hope she regains her job.

How I Unplugged and Lived to Tell About It | Michael Hyatt

Earlier this year I predicted 2012 would be a time that people would unplug from the Internet. Here’s a blog post by publishing executive Michael Hyatt discussing his attempt to do just that.

Hyatt’s post:  How I Unplugged and Lived to Tell About It | Michael Hyatt.

My previous post on unplugging: 2012 predictions

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